jmcgregor

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jmcgregor@arizona.edu
McGregor, Janice
Assistant Professor

Hi! I'm an Assistant Professor of German Studies and an affiliate faculty member in the Interdisciplinary PhD program in Second Language Acquisition and Teaching (SLAT). I completed my PhD in German Applied Linguistics at Penn State and subsequently held the position of Assistant Professor of German at Kansas State University from 2012-2018.

My experiences with identity, authenticity, and multilingualism shape my research endeavors, which center around three interrelated strands:

  1. Language learning, identity and learner beliefs;
  2. Culture and intercultural learning, especially in study abroad;
  3. Qualitative research methods in German applied linguistics.

My projects' findings highlight the need for scholars and educators to better attend to the coordinated interactional work that speakers do in social interactions (e.g. "naturally-occurring" interactions, in interviews), the value of adopting an understanding of "authentic" language as encompassing patterns of language and meaning that are both recognizable within and across communities of speakers and that are appropriated as one's own, and the value of examining beliefs about and constructions of intercultural learning in order to better articulate what it actually is and how to assess it. See here for my contribution to the Tucson Humanities Festival 2020: "Study Abroad and Un(doing) Harm".

Currently Teaching

GER 244 – Real Talk: Why Language Matters

In this course, students study conversational talk and its relationship to broader topics like identity, sexism, racism, and linguistic discrimination in the humanities, literary studies, cultural studies, and applied linguistics. This course emphasizes the conversational experiences of those who experience privilege and marginalization, drawing on intercultural texts and perspectives originating in German-language contexts. Using the tools and methods of conversation analysis, students collect and analyze their own conversations and learn how to write for a variety of discipline-specific contexts and genres. Taught in English.

In this course, students study conversational talk and its relationship to broader topics like identity, sexism, racism, and linguistic discrimination in the humanities, literary studies, cultural studies, and applied linguistics. This course emphasizes the conversational experiences of those who experience privilege and marginalization, drawing on intercultural texts and perspectives originating in German-language contexts. Using the tools and methods of conversation analysis, students collect and analyze their own conversations and learn how to write for a variety of discipline-specific contexts and genres. Taught in English.

In this course, students study conversational talk and its relationship to broader topics like identity, sexism, racism, and linguistic discrimination in the humanities, literary studies, cultural studies, and applied linguistics. This course emphasizes the conversational experiences of those who experience privilege and marginalization, drawing on intercultural texts and perspectives originating in German-language contexts. Using the tools and methods of conversation analysis, students collect and analyze their own conversations and learn how to write for a variety of discipline-specific contexts and genres. Taught in English.

GER 587 – Assessment in Second/Foreign Language Learning

The primary objective of this course is the development of language teachers' assessment literacy, which includes knowledge of key assessment principles and skill in creating or adopting assessment tools and procedures for the language classroom. Participants in this course will develop their knowledge and skills related to assessing all skill areas in the language classroom, including productive skills (writing, speaking), receptive skills (reading, listening), and assessing grammar and vocabulary. Grading and student evaluation will also be important topics of consideration and exploration in this course. Designed specifically for in-service (and pre-service) language teachers, the course combines theory with practice by covering essential principles of effective classroom assessment and the development of effective assessment tools for classroom use. Participants completing this course will become more assessment literate and better able to evaluate student performance in their classrooms fairly and effectively.